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    • http://www.fotolog.com/jban/?pid=11158641 ). Depois de vôos de teste e treinamento foi transferido para a California, onde um novo hangar foi construido especialmente para ele.
      Em Fevereiro de 1935 uma violenta tempestade no Pacífico derrubou o Macon e o afundou. Apenas doi tripulantes foram resgatados com vida.

      Segue abaixo o texto do site: http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/ac-usn22/z-types/zrs5.htm , da Marinha Americana.

      "USS Macon (ZRS-5), Airship 1933-1935

      USS Macon, sister of the 6,500,000 cubic foot rigid airship Akron (ZRS-4), was built at Akron, Ohio. She first flew in April 1933, only a few weeks after Akron's tragic loss. Following a series of test flights, one of which took her from Ohio to Wisconsin and back, she was commissioned in June. Macon was based at Lakehurst, New Jersey, during mid-1933 and made several development and training flights during this time. In October she flew by way of her name city of Macon, Georgia, and Texas to Moffett Field, California, where a new airship hangar awaited her.

      During the rest of 1933 Macon and her embarked airplanes began what would be an extensive program of participation in exercises off the Pacific Coast, testing her abilities for fleet scouting and other missions. In April 1934 she flew east, again via Texas, to Opa-locka, Florida. Weather damage received in this trip was repaired in time for her to participate in Fleet Problem XV in the Caribbean during May, after which she returned to Moffett Field. Macon made a long-distance flight over the Pacific Ocean in mid-July to intercept the cruiser Houston (CA-30), which was carrying President Franklin D. Roosevelt from Panama to Hawaii. During this mission her F9C "Sparrowhawk" aircraft were operated with their wheeled landing gear removed, a performance-enhancing practice that was thereafter normal when these small fighting planes were embarked on the airship.

      Further fleet exercises followed over the remaining months of 1934 and the first part of 1935. These demonstrated Macon's ability, in association with her airplanes, to conduct strategic searching over the vast distances to be expected in a Pacific war. However, they also showed her vulnerability, especially in the presence of opposing airplanes, when she was used for tactical scouting close to the fleet. During the early evening of 12 February 1935, while returning to Moffett Field from an operation over the ocean, USS Macon encountered a storm off Point Sur, California. A violent gust tore off her upper fin, causing damage that soon brought her down into the sea. Though all but two of her crew were rescued, the dirigible sank in deep water, effectively ending the Navy's controversial, and trouble-plagued, program of rigid airship operations."

      João Novello | jban"> Share on Orkut
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Zeppelin

Dirigíveis americanos: USS Macon 1933-1935

O mais novo dos dirigíveis americanos também teve vida curta. Construido como nave de escolta da frota naval, foi lançado semanas depois do acidente com o USS Akron, de quem cópia fiel. ( <A HREF="http://www.fotolog.com/jban/?pid=11158641" TARGET=_top>http://www.fotolog.com/jban/?pid=11158641</A> ). Depois de vôos de teste e treinamento foi transferido para a California, onde um novo hangar foi construido especialmente para ele.
Em Fevereiro de 1935 uma violenta tempestade no Pacífico derrubou o Macon e o afundou. Apenas doi tripulantes foram resgatados com vida.

Segue abaixo o texto do site: <A HREF="http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/ac-usn22/z-types/zrs5.htm" TARGET=_top>http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/ac-usn22/z-types/zrs5.htm</A> , da Marinha Americana.

"USS Macon (ZRS-5), Airship 1933-1935

USS Macon, sister of the 6,500,000 cubic foot rigid airship Akron (ZRS-4), was built at Akron, Ohio. She first flew in April 1933, only a few weeks after Akron's tragic loss. Following a series of test flights, one of which took her from Ohio to Wisconsin and back, she was commissioned in June. Macon was based at Lakehurst, New Jersey, during mid-1933 and made several development and training flights during this time. In October she flew by way of her name city of Macon, Georgia, and Texas to Moffett Field, California, where a new airship hangar awaited her.

During the rest of 1933 Macon and her embarked airplanes began what would be an extensive program of participation in exercises off the Pacific Coast, testing her abilities for fleet scouting and other missions. In April 1934 she flew east, again via Texas, to Opa-locka, Florida. Weather damage received in this trip was repaired in time for her to participate in Fleet Problem XV in the Caribbean during May, after which she returned to Moffett Field. Macon made a long-distance flight over the Pacific Ocean in mid-July to intercept the cruiser Houston (CA-30), which was carrying President Franklin D. Roosevelt from Panama to Hawaii. During this mission her F9C "Sparrowhawk" aircraft were operated with their wheeled landing gear removed, a performance-enhancing practice that was thereafter normal when these small fighting planes were embarked on the airship.

Further fleet exercises followed over the remaining months of 1934 and the first part of 1935. These demonstrated Macon's ability, in association with her airplanes, to conduct strategic searching over the vast distances to be expected in a Pacific war. However, they also showed her vulnerability, especially in the presence of opposing airplanes, when she was used for tactical scouting close to the fleet. During the early evening of 12 February 1935, while returning to Moffett Field from an operation over the ocean, USS Macon encountered a storm off Point Sur, California. A violent gust tore off her upper fin, causing damage that soon brought her down into the sea. Though all but two of her crew were rescued, the dirigible sank in deep water, effectively ending the Navy's controversial, and trouble-plagued, program of rigid airship operations."

João Novello




On January 02 2006 3 Views



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Analuciafrusca On 02/01/2006

Pelo visto, os de tecnologia alemã eram mesmo mais resistentes. Não creio, como o Rafael, que tenham sido mais resistentes por pura sorte.


Avatar lucia

Lucia On 02/01/2006

A chuva já veio Baba Azul, (é BABA, mesmo!), ainda bem que veio depois da meia noite...:)):)))):))))):P


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Biogui On 02/01/2006

Cara, que foto sensacional! Vê-se tudo bem pequenininho lá embaixo. Feliz 2006 para você. Nana do Gui


Avatar edubt

Edubt On 02/01/2006

Linda foto! :-)))>>> O que Veedol?


Avatar lucia

Lucia On 02/01/2006

Respondendo a sua pergunta:No Zeppelin, oras!!! :P____________________________________ jban @ 2006-01-02 08:58 said:Onde é que vc estava ????


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Rafael Netto On 02/01/2006

João, a contagem de baixas está ao contrário, salvaram-se todos os tripulantes, menos dois.A impressão que se tem é que os dirigíveis americanos eram particularmente frágeis. Os três (Shenandoah, Akron e Macon) sofreram colapso estrutural durante tempestades. Enquanto isso os alemães (inclusive o "naturalizado" Los Angeles) não sofreram estes problemas. Ou teria sido apenas sorte?<A HREF="http://fotolog.terra.com.br/rafael_netto" TARGET=_top>http://fotolog.terra.com.br/rafael_netto</A>


Avatar luiz_d

Luiz_d On 02/01/2006

A idéia de que resistiriam até a tempestades não se confirmou.<A HREF="http://fotolog.terra.com.br/luizd" TARGET=_top>http://fotolog.terra.com.br/luizd</A>


Avatar lucia

Lucia On 02/01/2006

Bom dia!A foto tá linda!Se eu tomar uma dose de Veedol, volto prá ler esse texto enorme... :P






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